WPC 2007

World Press Cartoon 2007

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  • 1st prize - Riber Hansson

    Grand Prix

    Putin

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/27.jpg

  • 1st prize - Tommy Thomdean

    Gag

    Naughty boy

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/24.jpg

  • 2st prize - Toshow

    Gag

    Labyrinth Maze

    Sérvia

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/25.jpg

  • 3st prize - Cristian Topan

    Gag

    Untitled

    Roménia

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/26.jpg

  • 1st prize - Riber Hansson

    Caricature

    Putin

    Suécia

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/27.jpg

  • 2st prize - Nacaró

    Caricature

    Bush

    Colômbia

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/28.jpg

  • 3st prize - Alfredo Sábat

    Caricature

    Fidel Castro

    Uruguai

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/29.jpg

  • 1st prize - Cristina Sampaio

    Editorial

    Illegal Immigration and EU

    Portugal

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/21.jpg

  • 2st prize - Victor Emmanuel Vélez

    Editorial

    Untitled

    México

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/22.jpg

  • 3st prize - Michael Kountouris

    Editorial

    David and Goliath

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/23.jpg

  • Alan Grandremy

    Editorial cartoon, caricature or gag cartoon; more than 150 events in over 40 countries are dedicated annually to the genre. Yet, how many newspaper and magazine readers could name one of their creators off the cuff? Very few of them, undoubtedly. Those events that manage to capture the public s attention, when the works exposure goes beyond the scope of the classroom, are not the same that the authors themselves frequent. Many of these initiatives have strictly limited resources. Others, heralded as periodical, vanish without trace. In addition, what is there in common between the Lithuanian Velocartoon and the Pulitzer Prize, the USA s famous award that lauds cartoonists as well as other professionals within journalism? They do have at least one thing in common: their existence does not go beyond the characteristics of a club, the audience being the sum of its members interests. Nevertheless, the number and geographical dispersal of the events, ranging across every continent, is a testament to an expanding trend. It is a trend that has lacked an axis and a reference, not to mention a purpose. In deciding to You don’t play around with humour, particularly when it involves an international competition of press cartoons! That is why I was strongly impressed with the exceptional quality of the organisation of the World Press Cartoon. Having taken part in countless events of the same kind in various countries, I can honestly say that I have rarely come across such seriousness and rigour. The explanation is that as they themselves are members of the profession and love cartoons, the organisers show the greatest respect for all the works that are submitted to the event. Respect, above all, for the freedom of expression of the authors. As long as they comply with all of the criteria of admission to the competition (format, technique used, proof of publication in the previous year, etc.), no cartoon is eliminated on the grounds of style or content. If a problem arises over the work s substance or form, it is discussed with impartiality. It is this respect and rigour in its procedures that guarantee the reputation of the World Press Cartoon and transform Sintra into one of the world capitals of caricature, editorial cartoon and gag cartoon. To be a member of the jury was indeed an honour and a joy for me, but it was also felt as a great responsibility: to distinguish, from among hundreds of works, the ones that appear to be the best, from every possible perspective, is no easy task. The value of the prizes adds to the difficulty of selection. Nevertheless, the cultural differences and the sensitivity of the jury-members helped to achieve harmony when it came down to the final decisions. Sometimes, in other events, the dice are caste in advance. This is not the case in Sintra. The president of our jury, António, allowed every member the opportunity to justify their vote, considering that the last word should be given to the defence. The discussions were passionate, impassioned and courteous. What is more, we were given all the time we needed for our opinions to ripen. Working in such conducive, comfortable surroundings is not exactly like working. Even less so when between the working sessions, we could enjoy the open, generous warmth of Portuguese hospitality in the company of our wonderful chaperone, Rui Paulo. I hope that the public will share the pleasure I took from participating in the 2007 edition of WPC, by leafing through this catalogue and discovering the works exhibited. The jury accomplished its mission with a calm soul and conscience. Now, it’s over to you to judge! A.G.

    Alain Grandremy was editor at the renowned French satirical weekly Le Canard Enchaîné for 25 years. Now retired, he spends his time organizing cartoon exhibitions and giving lectures on journalism. He is a member of FECO (Federation of Cartoonists Organizations) and is President of the Salon of Louviers. He has served on juries at various international festivals, such as Epinal (France), Forte dei Marmi (Italy) and Sierre (Switzerland). He is also involved with the International Salon of Saint-Just-le-Martel. Alain Grandremy was the coordinator of the book 100 Dessins pour la Liberté, published in 1990 in support for Amnesty International. He was a co-founder of the satirical magazine, Le Pére Denis and writes editorials for L Ivrogne.

  • Ann Telnaes

    Among the finest aspects of a cartoon is its ability to reach across cultures and countries. A reader can appreciate the artistry, message, or even the humor of a cartoon without sharing the written language of the artist and the fluidity of information and communication resulting from the explosive advances of the Internet has no doubt aided this. While last year s worldwide controversy of the publication of the Danish Cartoons showed that this open currency of commentary and opinion might be a double-edged sword, I think most would agree that we all benefit from this world bazaar of ideas. Freedom of Expression and the right to draw innovative, forward-thinking and even controversial cartoons must be protected. The World Press Cartoon competition was a highlight of my career, not only for the opportunity to work with my international colleagues in judging the works, but in the opportunity to meet many interesting, engaged people who truly appreciate the art of cartooning and caricature. I so enjoyed the discussions with Antonio, Rui, and the rest of my fellow jurors and to be part of a confluence of invigorated political thought. Above all, I appreciated observing first hand the broader international commitment to Freedom of the Press that was evident in this competition. A.T.

    Ann Telnaes attended California Institute of the Arts and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, specializing in character animation. Ann Telnaes editorial cartoons are syndicated with Cartoonists and Writers Syndicate/New York Times Syndicate. Her work has appeared in such prestigious publications as The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Le Monde, Courrier International, The Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Newsday, The New York Times and Ms magazine. Telnaes also contributes an exclusive weekly cartoon to Women’s eNews, an online news service. Telnaes work was shown in Washington, Paris and Jerusalem. Awards include: The National Press Foundation s Berryman Award (2003), The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning (2001), The Maggie Award, Planned Parenthood, for Editorial Cartoons (2002), The National Headliner Award for Editorial Cartoons (1997), Best Cartoonist, The Population Institute XVII Global Media Awards (1996), Best Editorial Cartoonist in the Sixth Annual Environmental Media Awards (1996). Telnaes is a board member of the Cartoonists Rights Network and the National Cartoonists Society Foundation. She is a past vice president of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists and a member of the American Newswomen s Club.

  • António Antunes

    In three years of the World Press Cartoon, I have worked with three completely different juries; different in terms of the jury-members countries of origin; different in the relations between the members, which ranged from great friends and accomplices to renowned artists without previous acquaintance; distinct in the unique blend of personalities with different sensitivities, from different cultures. All of these differences have made each jury an unprecedented experience. This year, the cultural cocktail comprised two members from the North American sub-continent, two Europeans and one Asian. To be a part of this group was fascinating and, once again, we could say without hesitation that what unites us is always stronger than what divides us. And what unites us is our common passion for the press cartoon, the professionalism with which we approach the genre and our desire to promote its quality and dignify its creators. The resident nucleus (the coordinator of judging sessions, administrative staff and myself) accumulated the experience that has enabled us to deal with the works and ensure that one more World Press Cartoon jury has In three years of the World Press Cartoon, I have worked with three completely different juries; different in terms of the jury-members countries of origin; different in the relations between the members, which ranged from great friends and accomplices to renowned artists without previous acquaintance; distinct in the unique blend of personalities with different sensitivities, from different cultures. All of these differences have made each jury an unprecedented experience. This year, the cultural cocktail comprised two members from the North American sub-continent, two Europeans and one Asian. To be a part of this group was fascinating and, once again, we could say without hesitation that what unites us is always stronger than what divides us. And what unites us is our common passion for the press cartoon, the professionalism with which we approach the genre and our desire to promote its quality and dignify its creators. The resident nucleus (the coordinator of judging sessions, administrative staff and myself) accumulated the experience that has enabled us to deal with the works and ensure that one more World Press Cartoon jury has functioned well. The fruits of these efforts are the prize-winning cartoons that you can see - our common denominator. A.A.functioned well. The fruits of these efforts are the prize-winning cartoons that you can see - our common denominator. A.A.

    António Antunes career as a professional cartoonist began at the daily newspaper República in 1974, the same year that he produced his first work for the weekly Expresso, where he has continued as the resident cartoonist until the present day. Throughout his career, he has received numerous awards, including: the Grand Prix XX International Salon of Cartoons - Montreal, Canada (1983), 1st Prize in the category Editorial Cartoon - XXIII International Salon of Cartoons - Montreal, Canada (1986), the Grand Prix d Honneur XV Festival du Dessin Humoristique, Anglet, France (1993), the Award of Excellence - Best of Newspaper Design, SND - Stockholm, Sweden (1995), the Premio Internazionale Sátira Politica (ex-æquo) - Forte dei Marmi, Italy (2002), and the Grande Prémio Stuart Carvalhais - Lisboa, Portugal (2005). António s many one-man exhibitions include Lisbon, 1982 and 2000; Porto, 1983, 1995 and 2000; Rio de Janeiro, 1983 and 1991; Bonn, 1983; Dusseldorf, 1983; Macau, 1987 and 1996; Brasília, 1998; Barcelona, 1999; Recife, 1999; Madrid, 2001 and Paris, 2004. António was President of the jury for the 3rd edition of the World Press Cartoon and is also the director of the salon.

  • Guy Badeaux

    It was a pleasure to leave Canada s harsh winter in order to look at cartoons, discover new talents as well as be part of a jury that includes both friends and cartoonists I admire. The fact that I could also discover the beauty of both Lisbon and Sintra was an added pleasure. I very much enjoyed visiting cartoonist Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro s museum, Portugal s most famous cartoonist and António s godfather. But can only regret that I did not have enough time to hear some live fado. But most of all, being able to eat mangos in February was a definite plus.

    G.B.

    Guy Badeaux (Bado) was born in Montreal in 1949 and has been the editorial cartoonist at the French language daily newspaper Le Droit, in Ottawa, since May 1981. He was the winner, in 1991, of the National Newspaper Award for the best editorial cartoon published in Canada that year. He is also the editor, since it s inception in 1985, of Portfoolio: The Year s Best Canadian Editorial Cartoons that showcases the work of 35 cartoonists in all.

  • Norio Yamanoy

    My name Norio happens to mean I don’t laugh in Portuguese and in Spanish. (The real meaning in Japanese is a Educated Hero!). As a jury member: 1. I look for cartoons that make me laugh. 2. I judge the quality of the graphics. 3. Then I throw a question So what? to the cartoon. Very few cartoons can answer this question. I think a cartoon must reflect the present day, for it is going to illustrate the last page, the newest page of Human History, lasting over 4 million years. And at the same time, it must influence man’s future. When a cartoon fulfils these impossible demands I applaud with one hand. N.Y.

    Chairman of the Japanese branch of the Federation of Cartoonist Associations (FECO), Norio Yamanoi lives in Aomori, 700 km north of Tokyo. Born in Tokyo in 1947, he left Japan in 1977 for Paris, where he made movies including one for UNESCO s Arms Reduction Campaign. In 1991 he won the Bunshun Manga Sho, the most prestigious cartoon award in Japan. Since 2003 he has been a member of The Public Eye on Davos, alternative conference, hosted by an international coalition of NGOs which runs parallel to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

  • Alfredo Sábat

    Alfredo Sábat

    Fidel Castro

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/29.jpg

  • Cristian Topan

    Cristian Topan

    Untitled

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/26.jpg

  • Cristina Sampaio

    Cristina Sampaio

    Illegal Immigration and EU

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/21.jpg

  • Michael Kountouris

    Michael Kountouris

    David and Goliath

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/23.jpg

  • Nacaró

    Nacaró

    Bush

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/28.jpg

  • Riber Hansson

    Riber Hansson

    Putin

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/27.jpg

  • Tommy Thomdean

    Tommy Thomdean

    Naughty boy

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/24.jpg

  • Toshow

    Toshow

    Labyrinth Maze

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/25.jpg

  • Victor Emmanuel Vélez

    Victor Emmanuel Vélez

    Untitled

    http://worldpresscartoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/22.jpg